world war II

Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard / Facebook

A historic dry dock at the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard turned 100 years old this week. But to last another 100 years, it will need billions of dollars in upgrades.

Wikimedia Commons

Diplomatic tensions between Japan and South Korea are rising again, after South Korean courts allowed lawsuits to proceed against Japanese companies, seeking compensation for forced labor during the Second World War. Japan argues that these issues were resolved in the 1965 treaty that established diplomatic relations between the two countries.

Wikimedia Commons

Although it has been 77 years since the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor that brought the United States into World War II, many American servicemen killed in the battle have yet to be identifed. But that is beginning to change. Technological advancements are allowing forensic scientists at the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency to determine the identities of hundreds of Americans who were buried as unknowns. 

Courtesy of Jon Itomura / Shinyei Shimabukuro

Community-driven recovery efforts are nothing new to Hawaiʻi. Whether it be massive flooding, a volcanic eruption or wildfires...the community finds a way to rally and rebuild. HPR’s Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi sheds some light on a little known recovery effort that began in Hawaiʻi 70 years ago.

U.S. Department of State / Flickr

Today marks the 73rd anniversary of the first use of a nuclear weapon in war. In 1945, the “Little Boy” bomb was dropped detonated over the Japanese city of Hiroshima, killing thousands and leveling the city. A group of Hawaii students is in Japan this week for a peace ceremony and to remember the horror of that bomb. 

Evelina Galang
Evelina Galang

Award winning writer and educator, M. Evelina Galang, runs into a lot of people who don’t realize that Koreans were not the only WWII “comfort women.”  “Comfort women” is the euphemism for girls and women abducted and raped by Japanese soldiers across the so-called co-prosperity sphere, including Korea through China and the Philippines.   HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on Galang’s new book, Lolas' House, which opens a window onto the Filipina experience.

Wikimedia Commons

73 years after the liberation of Guam, the US government has started to process claims for reparations. A bill signed by President Obama last December resolved decades of disputes over payments to those who suffered under Japanese occupation but we hear from Neal Conan in today’s Pacific News Minute, the arguments aren’t over yet.

In December 1941, Nine-year-old Forrest Mendiola Harris fled when bombs started dropping on his village. Now 85, he told the Pacific Daily News “I just want to say that I’m lucky that I lived through the war.”

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

On December 8, 1941, fires still burned in the wreckage of the battleships that lay in the mud of Pearl Harbor while crews in small boats continued the gruesome work of recovering the dead. Hidden amid the smoke, many of the seeds of the eventual American victory. More from Neal Conan, in the Pacific News Minute.

AP / US Navy
AP / US Navy

75 years ago, Japan attacked the U.S. Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor. The strike killed more than 2,300 people and propelled the United States into World War II. The anniversary brings back memories not just for those in the military but those who lived in Hawaii. Molly Solomon from Hawaii Public Radio brings us some of those voices.

Face of the Enemy

Dec 6, 2016
United States War Department (United States National Archives) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
United States War Department (United States National Archives) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

When Japan bombed Pearl Harbor seventy five years ago, thirty seven percent of Hawai‘i’s population was ethnically Japanese.  Honolulu hummed with Japanese run restaurants, sundry stores, hardware and grocery stores, everyone went to Japanese movies, and Japanese maids and gardeners worked in many wealthy homes.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on how Japanese and others felt during the period.

U.S. National Archives
U.S. National Archives

The bombing of Pearl Harbor was a turning point for Hawai‘i, but it was also the culmination of decades of militarization on O‘ahu.  At the same time, ethnic Japanese constituted forty percent of Hawai‘i’s population, a fact not lost on Washington, as Japanese armies spread across China and the Pacific.

Flickr / Presidio of Monterey: DLIFLC & USAG
Flickr / Presidio of Monterey: DLIFLC & USAG

A bill to award Filipino World War II veterans with the nation’s highest civilian honor is one step closer to becoming a reality.

Memories of the Hui Panala‘au

Nov 1, 2016
Courtesy of Noelle Kahanu
Courtesy of Noelle Kahanu

Hawai‘i lost a part of its living history last month. Paul Phillips passed away at the age of 94. He was the last survivor of a U.S. government project that sent scores of young men from Hawai‘i to colonize islands in the South Pacific. We get more perspective on the project and its aftermath from HPR Guest Commentator Noelle Kahanu.

The Conversation: Monday, May 30th, 2016

May 30, 2016
Flickr - Cold Press Publishing

Off Shore Wind Farm Proposal; Revisiting the Battle of Midway; Building Smart Housing on Oahu; Preserving Historic Pearl Harbor Site

Proposed Wind Farms in Kahuku and off shore: Henry Curtis

Marion Doss / Flickr
Marion Doss / Flickr

Over the weekend, an executive of Mitsubishi Materials apologized for forcing American prisoners of war to perform slave labor during World War Two. While the move was well-received in the United States, in parts of Asia there was a different reaction. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Ned Sato
Ned Sato

A Hawai‘i woman should have graduated from McKinley High School in the spring of 1943. But Sarah Okada Sato’s studies were put on hold when she and her family were forced to relocate to an internment camp on the mainland. This year, the state’s Department of Education sent Sato an honorary diploma, more than seven decades later. HPR’s Molly Solomon has her story.

Hawai‘i’s Plantation Village
Hawai‘i’s Plantation Village

President Obama is expected to announce the designation of three national monuments. One of them is Honouliuli, the largest World War Two internment camp in Hawai‘i. HPR’s Molly Solomon has more.

It’s a site that’s history was almost forgotten.

Honouliuli Internment Camp remained hidden from view in an Oahu gulch for nearly 60 years. It was one of five camps in the islands where the United States military interned Japanese-Americans during World War II.

Honouliuli: Why We Must Remember

Jun 11, 2014
Hawai‘i’s Plantation Village
Hawai‘i’s Plantation Village

Congress may soon designate Hawaii’s first national monument or historic site. It’s Honouliuli, an internment camp that held hundreds of Japanese Americans during World War II.

Carole Hayashino is the President and Executive Director of the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii. She has a very personal connection to this piece of history.

Tomorrow, we'll take you on a tour of the Honouliuli site, and explain how this piece of local history was almost lost.

Lost World War II Submarine Found Off Oahu

Dec 9, 2013
NOAA HURL Archives
NOAA HURL Archives

It’s a World War Two mystery with a Cold War twist. Researchers have found a Japanese super-submarine, buried nearly 2,500 feet below the sea. HPR’s Molly Solomon has more on the discovery of a lost World War II relic that’s been missing for more than six decades.

noe tanigawa

This Sunday, men and women of all ages will gather to celebrate the lives and accomplishments of women in Hawai’i.  This year, the “Distinctive Women in Hawaiian History Program” focuses on women of a pivotal period:  World War II.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.