USGS

D. Swanson / USGS

Federal geologists are examining samples of water from a growing pond in a Hawaii volcano's crater.

D. Swanson / USGS

A helicopter pilot flying over Kilauea recently found something unusual. There was water in the main crater, and that discovery has sparked a lot of questions.

M. Patrick/USGS

Scientists have discovered that a growing pond of water inside a Hawaii crater is being heated by Kilauea volcano. For the first time in recorded history, the presence of water in the crater was confirmed last week. Since then, scientists have found two other small pools of water nearby.

Caleb Jones/AP

A small pond of water has been discovered inside the summit crater of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano for the first time in recorded history, possibly signaling a shift to a more explosive phase of future eruptions.

USGS

It's been nearly a year since Kīlauea erupted on the Big Island's lower East Rift Zone. The event destroyed more than 700 structures and displaced hundreds, if not thousands, of residents. Scientists are still studying the eruption, but they think they know what did, and didn't, cause it.

USGS

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory recently put out a preliminary lava thickness map, based on last summer’s Kilauea lava flow. They’ve created similar maps before, but mostly for official publications. Now this map is on the HVO web site.

Wikimedia Commons

Over the past several months, the destructive eruption of Kilauea claimed some 700 structures and displaced entire communities. The lava activity has also opened the doors to research never before collected with the help of drones and undersea robotics.

USGS Volcanologist  Wes Thelen explains what is behind the pause in the lava eruption and what may come next.