telescope

Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi

A lot has changed in astronomy since Hawaiʻi astronomer Doug Simons began his career more than 30 ago. And a lot has changed on the mountain. Now he’s working to ensure the next generation has the same opportunities that he had. 

Laulani Teale

Protestors rallied against the Thirty-Meter Telescope on college campuses in California today. Demonstrations are planned for UH campuses tomorrow. 

Laulani Teale / Mauna Kea Hui

Native Hawaiian leaders opposing construction of the Thirty-Meter Telescope on Mauna Kea are taking their grievances beyond the shores of Hawaiʻi to TMT decision-makers and a financier in the Bay Area. HPR’s Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi has more.

Thirty Meter Telescope International Observatory

The Thirty Meter Telescope may have been given the go-ahead by the Hawaiʻi Supreme Court. But there’s still a lot that needs to happen before construction can take place on Mauna Kea. HPR Reporter Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi has this story

Alan Light / Flickr

The Thirty Meter Telescope is back in state supreme court. Today, justices are hearing oral arguments on the project’s building permit. HPR’s Ku’uwehi Hiraishi reports.

Wikimedia Commons

The board of directors for the Thirty Meter Telescope is meeting this week to decide whether to extend its April deadline. More time would allow legal proceedings to play out but none of that may matter after today’s floor vote in the state Senate. HPR’s Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi reports.

David Yee

Final oral arguments in the contested case hearing for the Thirty-Meter Telescope land use permit will be heard today in Hilo. Parties to the contested case will make their case before the state Board of Land and Natural Resources. HPR’s Ku’uwehi Hiraishi tells us what we can expect.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

Hawai‘i’s unemployment rate remains at its lowest level in a decade—2.7 percent. But if you’re looking for a new job, and your background is in astronomy, you may be interested in a million-dollar opportunity in China. But there’s a catch. Or several of them. HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.

In addition to looking for planets, we hear about a Mauna Kea summit discovery of cosmic birth taking place thirteen-hundred light years from Earth as HPR All Things Considered host Dave Lawrence with Christopher Phillips from the Mauna Kea Astronomy Outreach Committee for this week’s Stargazer.          

Learn more about this recent discovery at the Mauna Kea summit.            

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

    Last April, social media buzzed as sign wavings for Mauna Kea “protectors” were held as far away as Kentucky and Tonga. With that first wave of publicity over, the “protectors” both on Mauna Kea and Haleakalā now say there's a guiding principal that keeps them going.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on Kapu Aloha. 

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

  Two of Hawai‘i’s celebrated mountains, Mauna Kea and Haleakalā, remain in the crosshairs of a battle that appears to pit preservation of culture against pursuit of science.  In both cases, the state and counties are being called upon to enforce state land board decisions, while challenges to those decisions are before the Hawai‘i Supreme Court.   HPR’s Noe Tanigawa continues a look at Haleakalā, the issues and the mountain.

Noe Tanigawa

 

  

The very first telescope on Haleakalā was completed in 1958, and used for satellite tracking.  Three years later, 18 acres of ceded land at the summit were set aside for astronomy, becoming the Haleakalā High Altitude Observatory Site with the University of Hawai‘i as owner/manager.  Currently there are ten facilities on the mountain and another, a cutting edge solar telescope, is underway.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on the controversy over its construction.

 

    

astropixels.com
astropixels.com

The University of Hawaii Astronomy program has picked up a new telescope.

www.tmt.org
TMT

The UH Board of Regents recently approved a sublease for the planned Thirty Meter Telescope atop Mauna Kea on Hawai’i island. HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports that this advances the project but does not clear the way for construction to begin.

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