street art

Over a hundred artists are converging this week for Honolulu’s tenth annual Pow!Wow! street art festival. Key locations will have fresh new works of art as live painting continues all this week along the streets and byways of Kaka‘ako. Best of all, a generation is growing up in Honolulu with paintings by internationally renowned artists all around them.

noe tanigawa

  

  

  

  

  

  Pow!Wow! Hawai‘i is pressing on with its mission of igniting street art festivals around the world.  In March, Pow!Wow! staged its first event at the influential media mixer, South by Southwest.  Next month, Pow!Wow! rocks Long Beach, California.  Meanwhile, people continue to discover new paintings here in Kaka‘ako.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa offers this look at one particular work, by Egyptian artist, Ganzeer.

Pow! Wow! 2015

Jan 13, 2015
noe tanigawa

  

Lately HPR has been examining how arts and culture are playing a key role in kakaako’s development.  In this latest installment, Noe Tanigawa headed to the community’s center, Mother Waldron Park, to chat with the founder of Pow!Wow!, the street art festival that’s changed the look of the neighborhood.

Find out about POW!WOW! Hawai'i 2015

Pow Wow

POW! – that’s the impact art can have on a person, like a punch in the face. WOW! – That’s the reaction people have to art. Pow Wow is the biggest art event to hit Hawai’i in recent memory and over a hundred artists are painting their way through Kaka’ako this week. HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Pow!Wow!Hawai’i  continues with three exhibitions, art and music lectures and performances, classes, parties and live painting throughout Kaka’ako, closing Saturday night. 

Artists Return to Kaka'ako for 3rd Pow Wow

Feb 7, 2013
Flickr / Art La Flamme
Flickr / Art La Flamme

 

Honolulu's Kaka'ako neighborhood is buzzing with anticipation for the return of Pow Wow Hawaii. The week-long art festival brings a splash of color to Honolulu.

  Pow Wow co-founders Jasper Wong and Kamea Hadar say they anticipate as many as 100 local and international artists. They'll take to the streets starting Saturday, using blank warehouse walls as a canvas to share their cultural stories. Jasper and Kamea say none of this would be possible without the strong support of the community.