South Korea

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

  A decision made this week in Washington DC will have implications here in Hawaii.  It will also have a direct impact on US military personnel serving in the Asia Pacific. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Working Hard in Asia

Sep 2, 2014
Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

  On this day after Labor Day, how many hours do you plan on working? If you figure it out on an annual basis, employees in most industrialized countries work about 18,000 hours a year. But in some Asian countries, the totals are much higher.

Flickr Commons
Flickr Commons

  This continues to be a busy summer for visitors to Hawai‘i. A growing number of those travelers are coming from China. The numbers are still relatively small compared to visitors from other countries. But in South Korea, the numbers of Chinese travelers, and their economic impact are much bigger. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

  One month from today, a certain portion of the world’s population will turn its attention to Brazil. That’s when the World Cup begins: 32 teams from around the world playing for soccer’s most famous prize. Only three of those teams come from the Asia Pacific, and their travel plans are quite involved. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

 You may not have given much thought to your refrigerator lately. But some other people have. And the result is shaping up to be one of the biggest battles of corporate Korea—one that will be fought in American kitchens. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Flickr / Money Images
Flickr / Money Images

 

Among the many proposals before the legislature this session, two involve gambling. One would allow a stand-alone casino in Waikiki, and another would allow gambling aboard ships. While neither measure may make it to the governor’s desk this year, casino gambling is making new strides in South Korea. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

Recent concerns about compromised credit card data in the United States have focused on a couple of retail stores. Both Target and Neiman Marcus confirm on-line thieves stole some customer information. But there’s word from South Korea this week that nearly half the nation’s residents may have had their credit card information stolen. HPR’s Bill Dorman has the details in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

 

South Korea plans to cut back on its use of nuclear power. But that has not stopped the country’s president from lobbying for a greater role in the development of the nuclear power program of India. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Flickr
Flickr

  

Earlier this year, Hawaii became the 40th state to ban texting while driving. Texting has grown a lot in the last several years. A recent study found more than 80-percent of U.S. adults use their phones to text. But for some people in South Korea, texting has entirely taken over the telephone. HPR’s bill dorman explains in today’s asia minute.

biologycorner / Flickr

High school students in Hawaii can take college admission tests such as the SAT throughout the year. That’s NOT the case in South Korea…where everyone takes the test on the same day. And that stressful day for students is today. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Flickr / unknowndomain
Flickr / unknowndomain

The United States and the Philippines are talking about expanding their military cooperation…and that may involve some forces based in Hawaii. Meanwhile, the government of the Philippines is looking to another country for its latest acquisition of military aircraft. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more on that in today’s Asia Minute.

Flickr / World Bank Photo Collection
Flickr / World Bank Photo Collection

Lawmakers in Washington remain locked in a fight over the federal budget and raising the debt ceiling. In South Korea, budget issues of a different kind are sparking controversy. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Flickr / Frühtau
Flickr / Frühtau

As the new work week begins, there are signs of slightly easing tensions between North and South Korea. The two countries have restored the military hotline that was disconnected in March. And a couple of events taking place this week may show some further progress. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Flickr / Irish Colonel
Flickr / Irish Colonel

Queen’s Hospital was the first one built in the islands…founded in 1859. That makes it older than the first hospitals in South Korea. One of those facilities is having some unusual challenges this week—concerning VIP’s. HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.

Flickr / lanier67
Flickr / lanier67

The smoking ban at beaches, parks and bus stops on Oahu doesn’t start until January. But in South Korea, smoking restrictions in public places have been in place for about four weeks. HPR’s Bill Dorman has a progress report in today’s Asia Minute.

Flickr / nSeika
Flickr / nSeika

More than 60% of people in this country who own cell phones use “smart phones.” That’s according to a survey by the Nielsen Company. But a different kind of survey in South Korea finds that as more people use smart phones, there are some other issues that are also increasing. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

South Korea’s highest court says two U.S. companies that produced Agent Orange should compensate dozens of Vietnam War veterans. The suit involves Dow Chemical and Monsanto—but what happens next is not clear. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

President Obama is meeting the president of China today in California. One of the topics on the agenda is North Korea—and there are some new developments to discuss. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Flickr / samsungtomorrow
Flickr / samsungtomorrow

The U.S. trade deficit grew nearly 9% in April…thanks largely to an increase in imports from China. But buried in the statistics was another fact: the trade deficit with South Korea has now hit a record. HPR’s Bill Dorman takes a closer look in today’s Asia Minute.

Flickr / KOREA.NET - Official page of the Republic of Korea
Flickr / KOREA.NET - Official page of the Republic of Korea

The president of South Korea spent a couple of days in Washington this week. She met with President Obama and told a joint session of Congress that it’s time to stop rewarding North Korea for bad behavior. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

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