seed

This pandemic has turned lots of people’s attention down to earth. Newfound gardeners have emerged and there has been a run on seeds, soil and all things related to growing food at home. Today we talk about seeds; taking stock of the state of seeds and learning about groups in our community who are producing seed to sell and grow.

Joining our discussion today:

SHADE
SHADE

Many Hawai‘i residents are well-travelled and can knowledgeably compare the world’s great cities.  With Honolulu in the midst of a development boom, some wonder what is guiding this city’s transformation.  A group of local designers, architects and landscape designers is working to make sure communities are involved in changes that are coming with the rail transit project.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

J.B. Friday, University of Hawaiʻi
J.B. Friday, University of Hawaiʻi

The Hawaiʻi Public Seed Initiative aims to improve, increase, and promote biodiversity of crops across the state. By working with local communities, farmers, and gardeners, the Initiative aims to grow, harvest, store, and improve the very best seeds that thrive in Hawaiʻi. This will ensure that local producers can continue to provide locally grown -- not flown -- produce for island dinner tables.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Jill Wagner
Jill Wagner

The banking of seeds is a vital tool in the campaign to protect Hawaiʻi's forests. Hawaʻi Forest Institute's Hawaiʻi Island Native Seed Bank specializes in rare, threatened, and endangered species. This genetic safety net will provide native species with a valuable insurance policy.

Christopher Phillips explains...

noe tanigawa

 

   The five major biotech companies that dominate global seed production moved into Hawai’i after sugar and pineapple.  Since our climate allows three crop rotations per year, Hawai’i is now the number one place for experimental GE crops in the nation.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on the global food system we are a part of.