science

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UH Facebook

Scientists working with the University of Hawaii’s Institute for Astronomy are using the world’s first robotic laser system to explore large areas of space.

The Robo AO system compensates for the image-blurring effects of Earth’s turbulent atmosphere.  When attached to a large telescope it allows scientists to capture images that are sharper than ones taken from land based observatories.

hatchetcaye.com
hatchetcaye.com

  Here in Hawaii, Lionfish are an exotic aquarium attraction, with their long poisonous spines.

In the Atlantic Ocean, Red Lionfish have become an invasive species with no natural predators. They often eat up to ninety-percent of the smaller fish in a reef. But adding them into local fisheries in the Atlantic as a form of “conservational hunting” controls their numbers. They‘re caught…cooked…and taste a lot like red snapper. To protect Pacific fish, laws prevent their release into Hawaiian waters. Mark Hixon is a professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. 

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

Scientists from the University of Hawaii have discovered working communities of bacteria inside a drop of seawater.

Hoku Johnson/NOAA
Hoku Johnson/NOAA

A team of researchers has returned after spending two weeks studying opihi at the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. The group of ten scientists and conservationists have found early indications that suggest two species of the Hawaiian limpet are blending to create a hybrid opihi. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports.

Patricia Corcoran
Patricia Corcoran

 A set of plastic rocks found on Hawaii Island could become a new marker of human pollution. 

Scientists from the University of Western Ontario found the rocks on Kamilo beach on the Big Island, which is famous for collecting ocean debris.

They are calling them plastiglomerates and they’re formed  when plastic and beach sediment fuse together in high heat like a campfire or lava flow.

Hope Jahren
Hope Jahren

A University of Hawaii professor is taking what you might call a hands-on approach to science. She’s using social media, hundreds of contacts, and something called “Manicure Mondays.” HPR’s Molly Solomon explains.

Check out some recent "Manicure Monday" posts on Twitter from the scientific community:

First we'll look at the latest tech news and happenings in Hawaii and beyond. Then joining us today is Matt Heim from Electric Pencil to tell us about the upcoming Pacific Bridge Conference for entrepreneurs. Finally, we talk to Kanesa Seraphin about some of her discoveries from exploring science and culture across the Pacific in her program Voice of the Sea.

Lindsay Young
Lindsay Young

New research on the Laysan albatross reveals an unusual finding. A large number of these birds from a colony on Oahu are actually in same-sex relationships. HPR’s Molly Solomon visited the colony and has this report.

Deadly Snail Toxin Aids Medical Research

Jul 25, 2013
Flickr / NOAA Photo Library
Flickr / NOAA Photo Library

Sometimes research can move at a snail’s pace. But that’s just fine for a research team at UH Manoa's College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources---who are taking a closer look at killer snails. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports. 

First we'll look at the latest tech news and happenings in Hawaii and beyond. Then joining us today is Hoala Greevy here to tell us about his new app Dare Share. Finally, we'll learn about some of the science experiments being conducted on the voyaging canoes Hokule'a and Hikianalia on their World Wide Voyage.

Hawaii Public Schools Get Donated Lab Equipment

Jun 3, 2013
Flickr / UHMed
Flickr / UHMed

Over a dozen Hawaii public schools are receiving state of the art lab equipment, thanks to a program out of UH Manoa’s John A. Burns School of Medicine. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports.

Flickr / martincron
Flickr / martincron

A local entrepreneur who wants more kids to engage in science is putting his vision into practice. From Hawaii Island, HPR's Sherry Bracken tells us more.

First. a look at the latest tech news and happenings in Hawaii and beyond. Then Co-hosts Burt Lum and Ryan Ozawa  hear from two news guests. First is Bill Chismar from the UH Manoa Outreach College and a program called Science in Action. Then Mike Andonian from the Math Department tells us about next week's Monte Carlo night. Finally, we'll hear about ruggedized sensors monitoring the Ala Wai, and what this technology can tell us about our waterways.

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