new year

Noe Tanigawa

The Lunar New Year begins this Saturday. It’s the year of the metal rat and celebrations hit a peak Friday night through Saturday. Lion dances, firecrackers, even the foods of the season, are slipping from sight in Honolulu, but there's a spot at the Vineyard Boulevard edge of Chinatown that will be hopping Friday night.

Hauʻoli makahiki hou iā kākou! Mahalo to my best friend, Jon Alan, for bringing us into the new year last week.

New year, new music - some brand new, and some just new to my library. Kicking off 2020 manifesting a year filled with good music.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

In 2018, a host of factors led to the cancellation of Honolulu’s annual Night in Chinatown, held to honor the lunar new year.  This year, both the Night and parade are back, but as Chinatowns across the nation sputter and fade away, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports, Honolulu’s Chinatown, too, is in the midst of a struggle.

Dr. Roger White, author of "Slimming with Daniel" is in the studio, here to help us start the year off right with realistic health goals, and some inspirational stories as well.

noe tanigawa

  Chinatown is ablaze in red and gold right now in observance of the Chinese New Year.  Gold is a symbol of power, while red symbolizes happiness and good wishes will be flowing this weekend at Honolulu’s big celebration.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa found that everything means something in the food and activities around the new Year of the Horse.The first day of the new year is next Friday, so fireworks and lion dances will scare off evil spirits this Saturday, 10am to 10pm in Honolulu’s Chinatown.  Food, four entertainment stages, crafts, martial arts, plus the big parade, 3:30PM on Hotel St.

noe tanigawa

In Japan, Oshogatsu, the new  year celebration, is the biggest holiday of the year.  All but the most essential business operations shut down for at least three days, while people eat special foods with family and friends, and visit their local Shinto shrine seeking blessings for the year ahead.  Many in Hawai’i, not necessarily Japanese, follow these customs too.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.    

Izumo Taishakyo Mission of Hawai’i

Flickr / suacctnt
Flickr / suacctnt

Plans for the celebration of the Chinese New Year are already underway from Hilo to Kahului. Next year is the year of the Horse, according to the Chinese zodiac. And while the date itself isn’t until the end of January, officials in Beijing are already setting some rules. HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.

Ringing in the New Year with Fresh Mochi

Dec 31, 2012
Flickr / hawaii
Flickr / hawaii

This holiday season, many families will gather to celebrate the Japanese New Year's tradition of making mochi. You can pick up fresh or frozen mochi from many stores around the state at this time of year. But there's something special about making it the old fashioned way.