Minneapolis protests

AP Photo/John Locher

RAEFORD, N.C. — Mourners held a private memorial service Saturday in George Floyd's North Carolina hometown, and the nation’s capital prepared for what was expected to be the city’s largest demonstration against police brutality yet.

AP Photo/Julio Cortez

WASHINGTON — Scott Nichols, a balloon artist, was riding home on his scooter from the protests engulfing Minneapolis last weekend when he was struck by a rubber bullet fired from a cluster of police officers in riot gear.

AP Photo/Wong Maye-E

NEW YORK — New York City police officers surrounded, shoved and yelled expletives at two Associated Press journalists covering protests Tuesday in the latest aggression against members of the media during a week of unrest around the country.

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Democratic governors of some of the nation's most populous states on Monday pushed back against President Donald Trump's threat to deploy the U.S. military unless they dispatch National Guard units to “dominate the streets” in reaction to the violence that has erupted across the country.

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

WASHINGTON — Amid racial unrest across the nation, President Donald Trump on Monday declared himself “the president of law and order” and threatened to deploy the United States military to American cities to quell a rise of violent protests.

AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews

MINNEAPOLIS — George Floyd’s brother pleaded for peace in the streets Monday, saying destruction is “not going to bring my brother back at all,” while President Donald Trump berated most of the nation’s governors as “weak” for not cracking down harder on the lawlessness that has convulsed cities from coast to coast.

Hennepin County Sheriff via AP

Updated: 6/1/2020, 1:06 p.m.

MINNEAPOLIS — A medical examiner on Monday classified George Floyd’s death as a homicide, saying his heart stopped as police restrained him and suppressed his neck, in a widely seen video that has sparked protests across the nation.

AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu

MINNEAPOLIS — America’s cities boarded up windows, swept up glass and covered graffiti Sunday as the country's most significant night of protests in a half-century spilled into another day of unrest fueled by killings of black people at the hands of police.

AP Photo/Chris Pizzello

MINNEAPOLIS — Americans awoke Sunday to charred and glass-strewn streets in dozens of cities after another night of unrest fueled by rage over the mistreatment of African Americans at the hands of police, who responded to the violence with tear gas and rubber bullets.

AP Photo/John Minchillo

LOS ANGELES  — The massive protests sweeping across U.S. cities following the police killing of a black man in Minnesota have sent shudders through the health community and elevated fears that the huge crowds will lead to a new surge in cases of the coronavirus.

AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu

MINNEAPOLIS — Tense protests over the death of George Floyd and other police killings of black men grew Saturday from New York to Tulsa to Los Angeles, with police cars set ablaze and reports of injuries mounting on all sides as the country lurched toward another night of unrest after months of coronavirus lockdowns.

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

WASHINGTON — Shouting “Black Lives Matter” and “I can't breathe,” hundreds of people converged on the White House for a second straight day Saturday to protest the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis and President Donald Trump's response. In several instances, pepper spray was used to disperse the crowd as pockets of violence erupted.

AP Photo/Noah Berger

WASHINGTON — The Pentagon said Saturday it was ready to provide military help to authorities scrambling to contain unrest in Minneapolis, where George Floyd's death has sparked widespread protests, but Gov. Tim Walz has not requested federal troops.

AP Photo/John Minchillo

MINNEAPOLIS — Fires burned unchecked and thousands protesting the police killing of George Floyd ignored a curfew as unrest overwhelmed authorities for another night in Minneapolis, and the governor acknowledged Saturday that he didn't have enough manpower to contain the chaos.