invasive species

Office of Mauna Kea Management (OMKM)
Office of Mauna Kea Management (OMKM)

A large portion of the land mass of Hawaiʻi Island, is contained on the slopes of the tallest mountain in the world, Mauna Kea. The mountain is host to a variety of ecosystems, stretching from the coastal waters, to the arid aeolian desert of the summit area.

Christopher Phillips explains...

The Nature Conservancy
The Nature Conservancy

One of the most notorious and well documented threats to Hawaiʻi's forests ecosystem, comes in the form of sheep, pigs, and goats – the ungulates. The ungulates are responsible for much of the ecological devastation that has befallen the forest understory. Many precious plants species have been brought to the brink of extinction by the insatiable appetites of the ungulates.

Christopher Phillips explains...

The Nature Conservancy
The Nature Conservancy

Water, or wai in the Hawaiian language, is the heart of life in Hawaiian Islands. It maintains the many precious ecosystems across the state, it drives the agricultural economy, provides fresh drinking water, and unlimited health benefits. It's no wonder then that water lies at the heart of Hawaiian culture as the most treasured natural resource and a central cultural pillar.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Flickr / USDAgov
Flickr / USDAgov

Hawai‘i is ground zero when it comes to tackling invasive species. Nowhere is that more apparent than on the Big Island, where residents deal with everything from little fire ants to coqui frogs. And as HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, it’s the focus of an upcoming community forum.

hatchetcaye.com
hatchetcaye.com

  Here in Hawaii, Lionfish are an exotic aquarium attraction, with their long poisonous spines.

In the Atlantic Ocean, Red Lionfish have become an invasive species with no natural predators. They often eat up to ninety-percent of the smaller fish in a reef. But adding them into local fisheries in the Atlantic as a form of “conservational hunting” controls their numbers. They‘re caught…cooked…and taste a lot like red snapper. To protect Pacific fish, laws prevent their release into Hawaiian waters. Mark Hixon is a professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. 

 

Joining us today is William Hozey to tell us about the International VEX Robotics Summer Games. Then we have Lihla Noori from the Hawaii Conservation Alliance to tell us about the Conservation Conference called “Navigating Change in the Pacific Islands”.  Finally, we'll find out how the Nature Conservancy leverages the crowd and technology to find invasive species.

First we'll look at the latest tech news and happenings in Hawaii and beyond. Then joining us today is Marco Morawec to tell us about the Firehose Weekend for high school students and Meli James from HVCA to tell us about the relaunch of the Hawaii Venture Capital Association. Finally, we'll find out how citizens can help scientists, find invasive species and help fight plant diseases.   

An Environmental War That's For The Birds

Jan 29, 2014
Flickr / carla kishinami
Flickr / carla kishinami

Cattle egrets and barn owls are common birds around the islands. Before statehood, they were brought in to control pests. But they’ve become a threat to native and endangered birds. That’s led the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to propose a rule change to allow them to be killed. And that’s stirring controversy among wildlife biologists and animal advocacy groups, who say we should be looking at other solutions. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports.

Little Fire Ants Cause Big Problems

Jan 13, 2014
Hawaii Department of Agriculture
Hawaii Department of Agriculture

They’re no bigger than the head of a pin, but the Little Fire Ant can cause a huge amount of damage. The stinging ants have been on Hawaii Island for years. And now officials are worried it’s spreading to outer islands. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports.

"Invasion: Little Fire Ants in Hawaii" screening dates:

Flickr / whatstaiters
Flickr / whatstaiters

One of the most important duties of those who care for Hawaii's highest peak is conserving the natural resources. That includes both keeping invasive species out, and replanting endangered species. From Hawaii Island, HPR's Sherry Bracken tells us more.

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