hip hop

Tonight will be a little different in that our show will consist entirely of instrumentals across a wide variety of genres - particularly world, jazz and soul. Let's really test the limits here of "letting the music speak for itself."

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On episode 2 of my HPR + HIFF collab idea, our guest selections come from local Kanaka Maoli filmmaker, ʻĀina Paikai.

ʻĀina's portfolio includes several award winning nationally televised documentaries during his long career with ʻŌiwiTV such as Moananuiākea: One Ocean, One People, One Canoe, which HPR recently presented on Oʻahu, Kauaʻi, and Hawaiʻi Island. 

Fact: I am a 90s baby. Additional fact: I'm going to see the Backstreet Boys live here in Honolulu and am beyond stoked. So in honor of fulfilling my lifelong 90s-baby dream, I decided (under dj mrnick's heavily judgemental watch) to do a 90s throwback show featuring some of my favorite hip hop/R&B/indie rock tracks that I grew up with.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Childish Gambino’s viral video, “This is America,” offers a cold view of American culture that has sparked streams of comment online.   Gambino says he made the song for people to play on the 4th of July.  Spinoffs on Youtube beg the question, if a Hawai‘i version of “This is America” were done, what would it say?  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa asked a local hip hop crew, the Super Groupers, what they would include in a version of “This is Hawai‘i.”

amirah sackett
amirah sackett

Amirah Sackett is the founder of the all-female American dance trio, 'We're Muslim, Don't Panic,"  a troupe that believes in hip-hop's power to inspire and bring about positive change.  The Huffington Post recognized Sackett as one of "17 Muslim American Women Who Made America Great In 2016."  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on her upcoming performance in Honolulu.

So tonight I'm going to attempt a second Hip-Hop show, weaving in and out of radio friendly, and thought provoking songs with different...often jazzy cuts and reinterpretations.  

Tonight on Bridging the Gap, I'm talking to musician, filmmaker and activist Michael Franti, frontman for the group Spearhead.  They play shows this Friday at the Republik and Sunday at the Maui Arts and Cultural Center.  So the music will be positive, with heavy reggae notes.  

Listen to the interview: 

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Syrian American hip hop artist, Omar Offendum, was ready when the World Trade Center attacks thrust him into the spotlight.  In the years since, he’s used his platform to build links between the U.S. and especially, the Syrian culture in which he was raised.  Offendum is in Honolulu now, for a residency at Doris Duke’s Shangri La Center for Islamic Arts and Cultures.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports Offendum employs the raw honesty characteristic of hip hop to explore tough issues on a human level.