heat

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Europe’s record-shattering heatwave last week contributed to the hottest June ever recorded on earth.  It’s been hot in Hawaiʻi lately as well, although it hasn’t threatened public health. In 2003, a European heatwave killed 70-thousand people. Authorities and residents have learned lessons since then---but in Hawai‘i, how prepared are we for dangerous heat?  University of Hawaiʻi climate expert Chip Fletcher has some answers.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Today, on the summer solstice, HPR starts a closer look at how climate change is playing out in Hawai‘i.  We’re calling these reports “Planet808: Climate change in the islands.” And we begin with UH Professor, Chip Fletcher, author of Climate Change: What the Science Tells Us.

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HONOLULU — Hawaii has experienced record high temperatures since the start of June, officials said.

Broesis / Pixabay

While temperatures remain frigid across much of the mainland United States this week, it’s another story entirely in many parts of the Asia Pacific. That includes Australia—where some cities are seeing their hottest temperatures in decades. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Republic of Korea / Flickr
Republic of Korea / Flickr

Several science organizations now agree that last month was the hottest July on record for planet earth.  Calculations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration agree with those from NASA and Japan’s weather office.  And in South Korea, dangerous heat has continued well into August. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Flickr / Eric Rolph
Flickr / Eric Rolph

Sweltering summer temperatures have put the heat on the Department of Education to cool Hawai‘i classrooms. The DOE says they’re installing 250 portable AC units across the state. But as HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, some experts are hoping the department will also consider long term solutions to beat the heat.

Whether it’s a classroom or an office, when you’re talking about hot buildings, a good place to start is the roof, says Stephen Allen, an HPU professor who teaches courses in sustainable building. “Most of the heat gain for the buildings comes in through the roof.”

Flickr Commons
Flickr Commons

 

 While temperatures remain generally pleasant across the state this week, that’s certainly not the case in Australia. Parts of that country are sweltering under a heat wave that’s led to brush fires, electricity outages and safety warnings. And researchers there are blaming climate change. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Flickr / weirdchina
Flickr / weirdchina

Much of this week’s weather across the islands is expected to be seasonal. For Hawaii, that means lots of sun with trade winds. But across much of east Asia this summer, this summer is bringing record heat. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.