education

Flickr / albertogp123
Flickr / albertogp123

Student test scores may no longer be linked to a teacher’s job performance.

The Hawaii State Board of Education unanimously approved recommendations that would get rid of standardized testing from the evaluation process. That’s a big deal for educators, who say the evaluations are unfairly tied to teacher pay and impact retention.

Amy Perruso is the Hawai‘i State Teachers Association secretary-treasurer and a social studies teacher at Mililani High.

Reading, Writing, Arithmetic — and Relaxing

May 6, 2016
Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

Retention of new teachers continues to be a problem for Hawai‘i. The state Department of Education recently said it anticipates hiring as many as 1,600 vacancies for next school year. But as HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, educators are looking at creative solutions to keep those positions filled.

On a recent evening, teachers swapped their textbooks for yoga mats. That’s right -- it’s stress-relief night at the Hawai‘i State Teachers Association.

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

Transgender advocates are calling on the Hawai‘i State Department of Education to move more quickly on creating specific guidelines for transgender students. An online petition supporting those plans has already received more than 5,600 signatures over the past two weeks.

The Conversation: Wednesday, May 4th, 2016

May 4, 2016
Wikimedia Commons

The Long View; 2016 NASA Space App Challenge; Standardized Testing in Hawaii; Oiwi Film Festival

Long View: Neal Milner

The Conversation: Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016

May 3, 2016
Wikipedia

Every Student Succeeds in Hawaii; Getting Hawai’i Girls into STEM; Neal Conan on Primaries and the Pacific; Making Kapa

    

Governor’s Team, Every Student Succeeds Act: Darrel Galera

mana maoli
mana maoli

  Fifteen years ago, the Mana Maoli non-profit started Hālau Kū Mana charter school in Honolulu, with specialized programs in voyaging and music.  The music component, called the Mana Mele Project has grown now to encompass a music and multimedia curriculum, plus a mobile recording studio!  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on the premiere of their “Hawai'i Aloha” video and Mana Mele Festival set for tonight. 

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

Next month is graduation season, a good time to look back at how Hawai‘i students are making their way through college. It can be a lot harder for some, especially if you’re the first in your family to go to college. HPR’s Molly Solomon spoke with someone who knows this first hand.

Carolyn Phapakdy was always headed out of Wai‘anae. The 20 year old has big dreams, that include being the first in her family to get a college degree. "I'm just that way because I'm motivated to get somewhere."

The Conversation: Friday, April 15th, 2016

Apr 15, 2016
Wikimedia Commons

State Education Budget; Art from Trash; Hula Honeys

What’s in the Education Budget: Jim Shon

Is Hawaii Failing Its Special Education Students?

Feb 24, 2016
Flickr / dcJohn
Flickr / dcJohn

A recent internal audit by the Hawai‘i Department of Education revealed staffing shortages and significant problems in the state’s special education program. Despite nearly a quarter of the DOE’S budget going to special education services, students with disabilities are continuing to fall behind academically. HPR’s Molly Solomon has more.

In Hawaii, A Traveling Preschool Serves The Homeless

Jan 11, 2016
Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

One element of homelessness that doesn’t always get a lot of attention: the impact on young children, and in particular their education. There’s a group on Oahu that focuses on providing free preschool for homeless children and families. HPR’s Molly Solomon paid a visit and has this report.

About a dozen families stand in a circle, holding hands as they sing their morning pule, or prayer. They’re by a parking lot for a pair of homeless shelters in Kapolei. That’s where many of these families are living.

Pixabay Commons
Pixabay Commons

The Hawai‘i State Teachers Association says higher taxes are needed to improve education in the state.

The group has released a 10-part agenda for the 2016 legislative session. Topics include a reduction in class sizes, teacher retention, equal access to preschool, and an end to high stakes testing. The measure also calls for adequate funding of rural schools and repairs to air conditioning.

To fund the project – the measure recommends a one-percent increase in the state general excise tax. Corey Rosenlee is the HSTA President.

Ken Lund / Flickr
Ken Lund / Flickr

There’s some good news coming out of the University of Hawai‘i.

According to a report released by the University - graduation rates at UH Mānoa continue to rise.  A campus wide initiative to utilize new technology, an updated student road map called the STAR system, and counseling within individual colleges are being credited with the rise.   From 2010 to 2015 the six-year rate has increased from 48.6% to 57.1%.  The four-year graduation rate has increased from 17.5% to 27.9%.

Flickr / Eric Rolph
Flickr / Eric Rolph

Sweltering summer temperatures have put the heat on the Department of Education to cool Hawai‘i classrooms. The DOE says they’re installing 250 portable AC units across the state. But as HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, some experts are hoping the department will also consider long term solutions to beat the heat.

Whether it’s a classroom or an office, when you’re talking about hot buildings, a good place to start is the roof, says Stephen Allen, an HPU professor who teaches courses in sustainable building. “Most of the heat gain for the buildings comes in through the roof.”

Hawaii Classrooms: How Hot Is Too Hot?

Sep 16, 2015
Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

This year’s heat wave has brought record temperatures to the islands. Much of it felt inside the state’s sweltering classrooms, where most are without central air conditioning. Those high temperatures bring more than just discomfort for students, they can also be dangerous. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports.

pixabay.com
pixabay.com

We got an update on several of the key initiatives from the State Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism. We’ll get the latest on Broadband, the Creative Media industry, Tech and a new educational program developed by Pixar rolling out to the DOE.

ChefSteps / Flickr
ChefSteps / Flickr

Kapi‘olani Community College has broken ground for a new culinary school campus.  The Culinary Institute of the Pacific at Diamond Head is located at the former site of the Cannon Club.

The school will offer students an advanced professional certificate in culinary management.  The 25-million-dollar first phase includes two classroom buildings, parking, and an outdoor cooking area. Future plans include pastry and confectionary classrooms… as well as a teaching restaurant.  John Morton is the Vice President of the U-H Community College systems. 

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

Students in Nānākuli are spending the summer learning about the environment in their own backyard. The Mālama ‘Āina Field School is a hands-on summer program that focuses on getting more students engaged and excited about science and math. HPR’s Molly Solomon visited the camp and has this report.

Bytemarks Cafe: Science Literacy

Jun 17, 2015
Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

We talked with members of the brand new Science Communicators Ohana from the University of Hawaii at Manoa. In today's world, understanding science has become more important than ever before. But what forms of communication are best suited for advancing science literacy?

Moyan Brenn / Flickr
Moyan Brenn / Flickr

What’s more important to you—your health or your child’s education? That’s one of the questions that a credit card company recently asked several thousand wealthy people in Asia. And the results varied depending on the country involved. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Judge Halts Teacher's Attempt to Stop HSTA Revote

Jun 1, 2015
HSTA
HSTA

A new election will take place tomorrow to decide who will head the Hawai‘i State Teachers Association. Last week a state judge denied a request for a temporary restraining order that would have prevented the re-vote. HPR’s Molly Solomon has more.

Bringing Financial Literacy Into The Classroom

May 6, 2015
Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

Hawai‘i is one of the worst states when it comes to preparing its high school students for financial literacy. A study done by The Center for Financial Literacy gave Hawai‘i an “F,” along with 10 other states. HPR’s Molly Solomon looks at some steps being taken to raise that grade.

Families Navigate the Finances of Going to College

Apr 10, 2015
Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

By now, most seniors in high school have found out where they’ll be going to college in the fall. But the question of how to pay for it remains a challenge for many families. And that conversation usually begins with a single form. HPR’s Molly Solomon explains.

International Students Boost Hawaii Economy

Apr 9, 2015
Flickr / ISCTE
Flickr / ISCTE

International students who come to Hawai‘i to study contribute more than $205 million to the state’s economy. That’s according to a new report from the Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism, or DBEDT. But while the number of foreign students on the mainland has risen dramatically, the growth in Hawai‘i has been flat. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports.

Bytemarks Cafe: Educational Cyber Security

Apr 1, 2015

On this edityion of Bytemarks Cafe, we’ll take a look at Cyber security from an educational point of view. We’ll find out how programs like Cyber Patriot and the cyber security bootcamp are building capacity for the next generation of tech workers.

JABSOM Med School Students Meet Their Match

Mar 23, 2015
Flickr / UHMed
Flickr / UHMed

It’s one of the biggest events in a med student’s life:  Match Day. That’s when fourth year medical students across the country find out where they’ll spend their residencies. Last Friday, 66 graduating students from Hawai‘i’s John A. Burns School of Medicine woke up before dawn, anxiously waiting to find out where they'll start their careers. HPR’s Molly Solomon was there and has this report.

Pixabay Commons
Pixabay commons

Nearly 1/3 of students at Hawai‘i Pacific University come from overseas. Both HPU and the University of Hawai‘i recruit students from other countries, including China. But when it comes to American students taking courses in China, the numbers are actually dropping. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

  First we'll cover some local science and tech stories, first we'll speak with Franklin Allaire about the upcoming Science Olympiad. Then well have Ken Hensarling join us from Hawaiian Telcom to tell us about the annual HT University. Finally, we'll learn about the 20th anniversary of Teaching, Colleges and Community, an online conference about education technology from its organizers, Bert Kimura and Curtis Ho.

Hawaii Schools Brace for Common Core Tests

Mar 9, 2015
Flickr / albertogp123
Flickr / albertogp123

Starting tomorrow, schools across the state will begin a new wave of standardized tests. They're called the Smarter Balanced Assessments and they're part of the national Common Core standards approach. But as HPR's Molly Solomon reports, the tests come with some controversy attached.

Interested in what might be on the Smarter Balanced Assessments? You can take an online practice test here.

Town Square: STEM Education

Mar 5, 2015

  We hear so much about STEM education, but what makes it effective? According to the National Science Foundation, it's connecting STEM to real life questions. The NSF-funded  Science Education for New Civic Engagements and Responsibilities (SENCER) project does that. Our panel tonight explores what's happening with partner schools and how  Hawaii could become a SENCER model state. Guests: Amy Shachter, co-principle SENCER investigator; Denise Konan, Dean of the College of Social Sciences at UH Manoa and SENCER Fellow; and Robert Franco, Director, Office for Institutional Effectiveness at Kapiolani Community College.

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

Attracting visitors to Hawai‘i has never been a problem for the state where tourism is its main economic driver. But what about attracting students? HPR’s Molly Solomon takes a look at what the state is doing to improve international enrollment at local universities.

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