education

Boone Morrison

Hawaii Island has more public charter schools than any other island in the state. Most charter schools do not get funding from the state for physical facilities. But as the new school year gets underway, students and faculty at one Big Island charter school are looking forward to getting brand new facilities. And in this case, those are paid for by the state.

Wokandapix / Pixabay

On this edition of Bytemarks Café, a look at the impact of artificial intelligence and how students can get involved. A discussion with the team at Oceanit about how they've built a curriculum to help high school students learn about AI and get a jump on this exploding field.

Stem Works

Today on Bytemarks Café, Burt will find out what is planned for the upcoming annual statewide STEM Conference. He'll talk to the organizers of the special three-part hackathon for students featuring citizen science, coral hack, and the voyaging song challenge.

Meleanna Meyer
Meleanna Meyer

Recently, educators from Kamehameha Schools’ Ho’olaukoa Design and Strategies team gathered at Ho‘omaluhia Garden to experience a new teaching method called Arting and Writing.  This approach uses Hawai‘i based ideas and the environment to help learners find their own motivation. 

Ku'uwehi Hiraishi

We head to the Big Island for KanakaCona comic book convention, or comic-con, with a Hawaiian twist. 

Courtesy of Chaminade University

Chaminade University has gained approval from a court appointed manager to continue the doctoral program in clinical psychology previously run by the now defunct Argosy University Hawaii. The Argosy program was one of only two in the state that produced doctoral-level clinical psychologists.

Argosy University Facebook Page

Argosy University is expected to permanently close its doors today. The private university has 22 campuses around the country, including three in Hawaii. Earlier this week, Argosy said it would likely cease operations at the end of the week, sending students and faculty scrambling.

Ryan Finnerty

Educators don’t normally deceive their students, but every once in a while, they have a good reason to do so. That was the case at one local school when a staff member was the secret winner of an award often called “the Oscar of teaching.” A former teacher and current adminsitrator at Honolulu's Ala Wai Elementary School was the winner of a Milken Educator Award.

Wikimedia Commons

Among the 43 states that have a publicly funded preschool program, Hawaii ranks last with less than 5% of 4-year-olds enrolled. That's according to a 2017 report from the National Institute for Early Education Research. On Wednesday, Governor David Ige signed a plan that aims to expand access to public pre-k.

Sherry Bracken

Monday is inauguration day for Governor David Ige’s second term. It’s also the start of the first term for Lieutenant Governor Josh Green — and he has several pretty specific plans.

Teen Alert Program / Domestic Violence Action Center

Hawaiʻi teenagers are experiencing physical and sexual abuse in dating relationships at rates higher than the national average. That’s according to a survey conducted by the state in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HPR’s Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi reports on what this looks like and what is being done to prevent it.

Ku'uwehi Hiraishi

Math class isn’t what it used to be. For ninth graders at Hālau Kū Mana Public Charter School, it means escaping the classroom and losing the calculator. HPR Reporter Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi has this story.

Karen Kelsky

It’s been a year since the MeToo hashtag spread virally on social media, sparking a movement against sexual harassment. Academia – like Hollywood, the media and Congress – faced its own Me Too movement. HPR Reporter Ku’uwehi Hiraishi sits down with someone who’s been following the issue closely.

Flickr / danxoneil

A heated debate is taking place around the state over whether or not we should amend the state constitution. One proposal would give the state legislature the power to tax investment property to fund public education. That measure will be decided directly by voters through a ballot referendum.

Ryan Finnerty / Hawaii Public Radio

In one month Hawaii voters will decide whether or not to amend the state constitution. The specific amendment under consideration would create a property tax surcharge to fund public education. It would be a significant change in how residents are taxed in this state. Currently only county governments can levy property taxes.

NICK YEE

Voters will get the chance to decide whether or not property taxes should be used to fund Hawaii's public schools. A judge ruled on Friday that a referendum question to amend the state constitution could remain on the November ballot. 

Kenteegardin / Flickr

During this year's legislative session, state lawmakers approved the language for a statewide ballot referendum on a new amendment to the state constitution. If approved by voters, the amendment would create a state-wide property tax on certain investment properties to fund public schools. But attorneys from all of Hawaii's county governments are now challenging the proposal.

Valerie C. Simpson Architects & Associates

Hawaiʻi students and teachers will be heading back to school in less than two weeks. And this Big Island charter school has quite a lot to do before opening its doors for the coming school year.  The school lost its campus to the ongoing lava flow in Puna. HPR’s Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi has this story.

Ku'uwehi Hiraishi

If you build it, they will come. A tight-knit community of local Tokelauans are building a traditional canoe. They’re doing it as they would in their ancestral homeland – a small set of islands half way between Hawaiʻi and New Zealand. They’re hoping the project will encourage younger generations to learn more about their language and culture. HPR’s Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi has this story.

The Conversation: Friday, June 22nd, 2018

Jun 22, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

TMT Supreme Court Hearing; Civil Asset Forfeiture; Teacher Resignations; Storytelling Show

Bytemarks Café: Tech and Education

May 16, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

Today on Bytemarks Café, Burt and Ryan will get an update on the technology connecting Hawaiʻi's classrooms, and how it's evolving to prepare our keiki for the future. The Chief Information Officer for the Department of Education, Brook Conner, joins the show to share his vision for ed-tech in Hawaiʻi.

Thelmadatter / Wikimedia Commons

Today on Bytemarks Café, Ryan and Burt will explore ways to reinvent education and whether artificial intelligence can pave the way. Joining the guys will be Mid-Pacific Institute's Brian Dote and renowned educational philanthropist Ted Dintersmith to explore whether A.I. can put Hawaii students on the path to most likely succeed.

The Conversation: Tuesday, January 23rd, 2018

Jan 23, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

2018 Homeless Survey; Education Philosophy; Hotel Disaster Preparedness; Freddie Miranda Jr.

Bytemarks Café: Project Lead the Way

Dec 6, 2017
Scott Dahlem / Wikimedia Commons

  Today on Bytemarks Café, we’ll learn about an educational organization called Project Lead the Way. We’ll find out how their instructional design centers and real-world project focus helps students succeed in college, career and beyond.

Project-based learning may be a buzzword in education, but the idea is anything but new. Before textbooks, ancient Hawaiian traditions were passed down generation to generation through hands-on learning. Educators at Roosevelt High School are hoping to find student success in applying this same approach. HPR reporter Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi has this story.

Bytemarks Café: A Coding Curriculum

Nov 15, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

  Today on Bytemarks Café, we’ll hear how computer science and computational thinking are making their way into K through 12 curriculum. We’ll talk to code.org and their partners Women in Technology to find out how coding skills prepare our students for the 21st century workforce.

sotfconf.org
sotfconf.org

Today on Bytemarks Café, the guys will hear about the Schools of the Future Conference - bringing together private schools and public schools to improve education. Funded by the Hawaii Community Foundation, the Conference highlights best practices and learning environments to prepare our students for the future.

creative commons
creative commons

After decades of tracking socio-economic and educational statistics and trends, a UH Mānoa professor charges that people in Hawai‘i appear to be quite tolerant of ethnic inequality.  Professor Jonathan Okamura says ethnic inequality here plays out in the same way racism does in other places.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Back to School Hawai'i

Back to School. Today is the first day of the 2017 school year for tens of thousands of Hawaiʻi public school students. For many families, getting ready for going back to school has not only been a time-consuming process – but an expensive one. HPR’s Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi reports.

Kamalani Academy

More than 20 years have passed since the first charter school was authorized here in Hawai’i. Since then, public charter schools have fueled educational innovation to offer students and parents school choice. Next month, two more charter schools will open their doors. As HPR’s Ku’uwehi Hiraishi reports, getting these schools up and running is quite a task.

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