China

Nzeemin / CC BY-SA 3.0 / Wikimedia Commons

Another incident in the South China Sea. Yesterday, the Philippines Secretary of Defense said that a Chinese fishing vessel rammed and sank a Philippine boat, and then left 22 crewmen to “the mercy of the elements,” as he put it.

www.kremlin.ru / CC BY 4.0

President Trump marked the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasion with a visit to France, following his stop in the United Kingdom. But he’s not the only world leader on the road this week. It’s been getting less media attention in this country, but there’s been another gathering that has implications for U.S. policy in the Asia Pacific.

Matt York/AP

PHOENIX — The biggest victims of President Donald Trump's tariffs won't necessarily be Mexicans or Chinese or young urbanites who will have to pay more for avocado toast.

The people likely to pay the steepest price for Trump's attempts to bend Mexico and China to his will are poor Americans, who already live close to the financial edge and could have to pay more for everyday purchases.

AP Photo/Jeff Widener

Today marks the 30th anniversary of Tiananmen Square crackdown in Beijing. Much of the coverage centers on memories of that bloody night, and how its impact is still felt today. Another part of the story is the international media itself, and why so many of them were in Beijing at that time.

Sadayuki Mikami/AP

BEIJING — Thirty years since the Tiananmen Square protests, China's economy has catapulted up the world rankings, yet political repression is harsher than ever.

Ronald Lee / CC BY 2.0 / Flickr

President Trump’s recent visit to Japan included a stop on a Japanese helicopter carrier. The president talked about military exercises involving regional allies, but China is having similar discussions this week.

Bernard Spragg / Flickr

In an effort to lower trade deficits and protect American companies, the Trump Administration has levied tariffs on more than $250 billion worth of goods imported to the United States. Many of those products are inputs, goods used by domestic companies to produce their own products. This series explores how Hawaii-based businesses are being impacted by those tariffs.

Maui Brewing Company

A 25 percent tariff on Chinese-made steel poses “a tremendous challenge” for Maui Brewing Company, according to co-founder and owner Garrett Marrero. Uncertainty surrounding the tariffs has led Hawaii’s largest craft brewer to postpone major capital purchases needed to continue the company’s growth.

Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Mark J. Rebilas / U.S. Navy

Australia’s ABC reports that Australian military helicopters were targeted by lasers in the South China Sea. The laser attacks apparently came from China’s maritime militia.

USAID

The Pacific region is the most dependent on international aid of any region in the world, with 6 percent of regional GDP coming from foreign aid. The common narrative is that China is dominant in that space.

But a recently completed project by Australia’s Lowy Institute found the truth to be a lot more complex.

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Andy Dunaway

Two of America’s closest allies in the Western Pacific have challenged the facade of U.S. strategic policy. While American officials insist that the Indo-Pacific Strategy is not aimed at any individual country, the leaders of Palau and the Marshall Islands named China as the source of military and economic threats in the region.

AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein

One of the latest hits with Wall Street investors is a Chinese coffee company. It’s giving some competition to Starbucks, but with a very different approach.

Buonasera / Wikimedia Commons

While U.S. stocks are trading higher this morning, trade tensions with China remain a concern for world financial markets. And there are further complications in the Asia Pacific.

nox-AM-ruit / CC BY 2.0 / Flickr

Trade talks between the United States and China remain a focus for global financial markets, as they have been for much of the week. But there’s other trade news involving China this week — and it’s a story involving billions of dollars and renewable energy.

DrRandomFactor / CC BY-SA 3.0 / Wikimedia Commons

Trade negotiations between China and the United States are a focus for global financial markets this week. But there’s another development involving China that also has implications for the United States.

Xiengyod / CC BY-SA 4.0 / Wikimedia Commons

Here’s a question that’s familiar to residents of Oahu: what’s the best way to pay for a multi-billion dollar rail project? It’s a question that’s also coming under increased focus in Thailand.

NordNordWest / Wikimedia Commons

37 world leaders gather in Beijing this week for a Belt and Road Summit. Addressing concerns about China’s goals, Foreign Minister Wang Yi told reporters last week that the huge infrastructure project is not a “geopolitical tool.” But China’s economic clout inevitably builds political influence.

justin phillips / CC BY 2.0 / Flickr

For people who celebrate Easter this weekend, ham could be on the menu. It’s one food item that’s likely to see prices move higher in coming months — mostly because of what’s going on in China.

PublicDomainPictures / Pixabay

Infrastructure spending is an issue before both the state legislature and the U.S. congress. It’s also the topic of an international gathering next week in China.

Studio Incendo / CC BY 2.0 / Flickr

This fall will mark five years since massive protests choked the streets of Hong Kong. This week, several leaders of that movement have been convicted of criminal charges.

Base64, retouched by CarolSpears / CC BY-SA 3.0 / Wikimedia Commons

These are challenging times for the city of Hong Kong. A recent survey found residents the least optimistic about the future in 25 years. And that’s not all.

PAC Tom Sperduto / U.S. Coast Guard

On Monday, a U.S. Navy Destroyer and a Coast Guard Cutter made a transit of the Taiwan Strait. That’s the fifth time in the past six months that American warships have made the controversial passage between Taiwan and mainland China, but the first time that the Coast Guard has been involved.

Jorge Simonet / CC BY-SA 4.0 / Wikimedia Commons

A new round of trade talks gets underway this week between the United States and China. One of the many topics covered by trade agreements is the movie industry. And in China, that business is undergoing some changes.

Wikimedia Commons

The United States and China are continuing trade talks, and the outcome remains uncertain. On Tuesday, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer told a Senate panel “our hope is that we are in the final weeks” of the talks. But in the meantime, one area that’s experiencing some volatility is China’s auto sector.

Martin Falbisoner / CC BY-SA 3.0 / Wikimedia Commons

Australia’s ABC reports that two senior members of the National Security Council made a rare visit to the Pacific last week, with stops in Vanuatu, the Solomon Islands, Australia, New Zealand and Japan. The trip is seen as the latest sign that the United States plans to challenge China’s growing influence.

Adam Selwood / Creative Commons / Flickr

The governments of Fiji and Vanuatu are having second thoughts about projects funded by China. In Port Vila, the National Convention Center appears to be a white elephant, while Fiji is considering charges against a Chinese resort developer.

Mark Morgan / Creative Commons / Flickr

A U.S. Senate panel has issued a report that’s critical of an educational organization backed by the Chinese government. And it’s a group that has a presence here in Hawai‘i.

CSIRO / www.scienceimage.csiro.au/image/10945

The United States and China are continuing trade talks this week in Washington. But Chinese trade elsewhere in the Pacific has moved to the top of the economic agenda for a U.S. ally.

Tākuta / Flickr

Canada’s relations with China have sunk to a new low following the arrest of a senior executive of the telecom giant Huawei. Two Canadians have been arrested in China and another sentenced to death. Now, New Zealand is worried about its relations with China, though the signals are not entirely clear.

mark broadhurst / Pexels

Australia appears to be the latest target of politically motivated cyber attacks. Foreign governments have been identified in previous attacks on France, Britain, Germany and the United States; now Australia’s prime minister blamed a “sophisticated state actor” for attacks on the networks of the country’s major political parties.

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