Center for Oral History

Jimmy Emerson, DVM/Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Today, we're revisiting our conversation with the Center for Oral History at UH Mānoa about the town of Waialua.

Guests include Kim-Hee Kanoe Wong, oral historian and instructor for the North Shore Ethnographic Field School, UH Professor Ty Kāwika Tengan with the Departments of Ethnic Studies and Anthropology, and Waialua community member and Kumu Hula Keith Awai.

Joel Bradshaw/WikimediaCommons / (CC0 1.0)

Today we spotlight the history of the Oahu North Shore town of Waialua. The first sugarcane plantation started there in 1865, but it wasn’t a success until decades later. Castle and Cooke bought the plantation in 1898 and built a new mill, a railway system, water storage and irrigation. By 1991, the Waialua Sugar Mill produced 8% of the sugar in Hawaii.

 

Palama Settlement Oral History; Scaled-back RIMPAC; Economic Shortfall of RIMPAC

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Listen to stories from flower lei sellers from the 1980s, courtesy of the University of Hawaii's Center for Oral History. In studio with host Catherine Cruz is HPR's Bill Dorman and Greg Pai, former state economist and whose family once grew carnations for lei on Wilhelmina Rise. 

Callers also chimed in with their favorite floral lei memories.

Do you have your own stories and memories of lei flowers? Call our Talk Back line at (808) 792-8217 and leave a message. We may air it in a future episode.