Business News

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As Hawaii slowly reopens for business, its clear that work is going to different.

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They say the first year of a job is the toughest. That may be especially true for Dave Moss, who took charge of the Hawaii Symphony Orchestra just before stay-at-home orders cancelled its season.

Casey Harlow / HPR

More than 20,000 loans in the Paycheck Protection Program have been approved for Hawaii and local banks were on the frontlines of making them happen.

Casey Harlow / HPR

No sector is untouched by the shutdown economy that’s rolled through the islands and the world. That includes residential real estate. But what’s the year ahead looking like?

AP Photo/Caleb Jones

In addition to the health challenges of the COVID19 pandemic, the economic consequences are hitting every sector in the islands. And that includes non-profit organizations. Many are stepping up to meet critical needs such as food insecurity and homelessness — even as they are suffering financial pain themselves.

AP Photo/Caleb Jones

At this point, Governor David Ige’s stay-at-home orders are scheduled to expire at the end of the month. As more attention turns to an eventual economic comeback, both the public and private sectors are gearing up for what may come next.

Pau Maui Vodka and Maui Gold Pineapple

Businesses in Hawaii are adopting various strategies to survive the current shutdown because of COVID-19. One approach is to retool their operations to make what Hawaii needs now.

Liam James Doyle / NPR

Billions in federal economic aid are on their way to Hawaii. And a locally-based payroll expert helped write some of the rules.

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Survival is order the day for many Hawaii businesses as the economic impacts of working-from-home make themselves felt. Help is available.

Catherine Cruz / HPR

Social distancing has made its way to Hawaii as a way to prevent the spread of coronavirus. And its impacts have been felt immediately — and in nearly every industry.

Casey Harlow / HPR

Hawaii is feeling the effects of the global response to the spread of coronavirus. 

Casey Harlow / HPR

Legislators are looking for ways to ease the cost of housing in Hawaii. One potential target they’re looking at: foreign investors.

Kathryn Loydall from Pixabay

Crack seed is one of Hawaiʻi's local charms. As a child, Honolulu resident Clayton Chang dreamed of owning his favorite neighborhood crack seed store. It's a dream that eventually came true -- along with a transformation to shave ice.

AP Photo/Marco Garcia

It's the end of a real estate era in Kahala, as Alexander & Baldwin sells the last three Kawamoto homes.

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The Kaiser Foundation’s Health Plan and Hospitals has a new president. He’s been on the job for a few months now, and his early priorities include improving care. Part of reaching that goal includes finding more doctors.

@david-329538 / Pexels

A new round of change is coming to a familiar local company: Hawaiian Host. CEO Edward Schultz is taking the company into a major rebranding — and some product innovation.

Edmund Garman / CC BY 2.0 / Flickr

Waikīkī has seen a lot of changes in recent years. That’s especially true for its retail scene — which has gone through a transformation in less than a decade. 

Free-Photos from Pixabay

For a look ahead at 2020, Pacific Business News checked in with a range of industries to find out more about their biggest opportunities and challenges.

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Hawaii had a busy year in business and industry in 2019.

Joel Bradshaw / Wikimedia Commons / Public Domain

2019 has been a very strong year for the stock market. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is up more than 17%. And the broader S&P 500 is even higher — up more than 26% at Monday’s close. We’re taking a look at how some local publicly-held companies have done this year.

Manfred Richter from Pixabay

The founder of the Partners in Development Foundation is stepping down. And he’s leaving behind a 20-million-dollar nonprofit that has become essential. 

Casey Harlow / HPR

In just four years, a new private investment firm has acquired a dozen parcels of land along a short stretch of Kapiolani Boulevard.

Casey Harlow / HPR

Business and politics have always had a close relationship. But these days, more businesses are getting overtly political on the national stage, and in some cases, on a local level.

wendy julianto from Pixabay

Producing clothing locally in Hawaiʻi is a challenge for any company. But for the owners of one local firm, that's only part of the story.

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Hawaii restaurant owners confront challenges from meeting customers’ expectations for new items to finding good help. And that’s true whether they have a single location — or many more.

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The King Street space that long housed Café Sistina has a new restaurant tenant.

Amy Nakamura / HPR

Protests are continuing against three separate projects in Hawaii. That’s led people who work with infrastructure development to rethink how they engage the public.

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As Halloween approaches next week, it’s a reminder that some businesses consider that date a seasonal highlight. That’s certainly true for a pair of entrepreneurs who are juggling several scary ventures on Oahu.

Olya Adamovich / Pixabay

A famous guest facility on the island of Lanai is about to re-open after being closed for the past four years. Rooms will be available starting in November—but they will require a pretty substantial investment.

Sandra Oshiro/HPR

The future of worker benefits just might include free college. It’s a concept that is getting some attention on the mainland, and it may have a future here in the islands. 

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