The Conversation: Worldwide Vaccine Rollout Raises Questions

Dec 8, 2020

Vaccine Trials, Rollout Reaction; Black Water Dive Guide; Reality Check: Uncertainty Surrounding Rail Bids; Waikiki Film

Vaccine Trials, Rollout Reaction

This morning the headlines out of London are hailing the first citizens to get the COVID-19 vaccines produced by Pfizer. Among those who have been watching the events unfold are Hawaii residents who took part in the clinical trials here in the islands.


Not everyone is in a rush to get the vaccines. There are some who aren’t convinced it will be safe, but Ryan Ozawa who agreed early on to be a guinea pig to test the experimental drug had no qualms about signing up. Ozawa may be familiar to HPR listeners. He was a co-host of Bytemarks Cafe and is currently Communications Director for the real estate tech company Hawaii Information Service.

Credit Jeff Milisen

Blackwater Dive Guide

Blackwater diving. Sound intriguing? Well, do we have a guide for you.

Jeff Milisen loves marine science and photography. He has managed to combine his passions and now has a collection of stunning images put together as a field guide .

Science meets art for this Kona diver who studied at the University of Hawaii Manoa and worked at the Waikiki Aquarium. His images of amazing sea creatures just pop against the night diving blackness, and his is love for his work is infectious.

Reality Check: Uncertainty Surrounding Rail Bids

Honolulu Civil Beat’s reality check has the latest on the most expensive municipal project ever in Hawaii’s history - coming up on ten billion dollars. Reporter Marcel Honore joins us today.

Waikiki Film

The closing film of this year’s Hawaii International Film Festival has drawn much attention for its surreal and darkly honest depiction of life in the Hawaiian islands. The film centers on a Native Hawaiian woman named Kea who throughout the course of the film deals with issues like homelessness, domestic abuse and addiction. While the film has been praised for its gritty subject matter, director Christopher Kahunahana says that the intention was not to “try” to be anything - only to serve as an honest depiction of the Hawaii he and so many others know. He spoke with The Conversation’s Harrison Patino about the film.