Boeing Dealing With Second Software Problem On Troubled Jet

Apr 5, 2019

In this photo taken with a fish-eye lens, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane sits on the assembly line during a brief media tour in Boeing's 737 assembly facility, Wednesday, March 27, 2019, in Renton, Wash. The Federal Aviation Administration plans to revamp oversight of airplane development after the two deadly crashes of Boeing's new 737 Max 8 airplane, according to testimony prepared for a Capitol Hill hearing on Wednesday.
Credit Associated Press/Ted S. Warren

Boeing has found another software issue that needs fixing on its 737 Max jets, and the discovery explains why the aircraft maker is delaying its schedule for getting the planes back in the air.

A Boeing spokesman on Friday called it a "relatively minor issue" and said the plane maker already has a fix in the works.

The spokesman, Charles Bickers, said the latest issue is not part of flight-control software that Boeing has been working to upgrade for months.

That software, known by its acronym MCAS, is suspected in two recent deadly crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia that led regulators to ground the plane worldwide last month.