Ku`uwehi Hiraishi

General Assignment Reporter

Ways to Connect

Ray_LAC/Flickr (CC by 2,0)

Museums and archives are often celebrated as rich repositories of culture and history. But for the communities whose culture and history are on display, having a say over what should become of these items is an ongoing battle – one that some native Hawaiian advocates and scholars are tackling head on.

Deborah Ward

The University of Hawaiʻi Board of Regents on Wednesday approved the latest draft of rules governing activities on Mauna Kea and a resolution that calls for a plan to improve management of the mountain.

 

Office of Mauna Kea Management

The University of Hawaiʻi Board of Regents today is considering a proposal to review possible new management options for Mauna Kea in the wake of a three-month protest against the planned Thirty Meter Telescope. Some working models could broaden the role of native Hawaiians in directing the mountain's future.

 

Gerardo Lazzari/Wikimedia Commons / Creative Commons License 2.0

Hundreds of owners on the Big Island are seeking exemptions to operate short-term vacation rentals legally in residential neighborhoods but their neighbors have flooded officials with letters of objections.

Ku'uwehi Hiraishi/HPR

For centuries, native Hawaiians fed themselves by developing sophisticated systems of fishponds and irrigated taro patches. But societal changes disrupted their connection to traditional food sources, leading to high health risks for diabetes, obesity, and other diseases. Now a community intervention is underway in Waimānalo using backyard aquaponics. 

Hawaii State Archives

Much of the discussion surrounding the protests on Mauna Kea has focused on historical injustices experienced by native Hawaiians. Some events are well-known, like the overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom. But others have only recently been rediscovered.

Ku'uwehi Hiraishi

Opposition to the Thirty Meter Telescope may be at the forefront of Mauna Kea protests, but some native Hawaiian practitioners are questioning the cumulative effects of development on the mountain.  Is the construction of 13 telescopes on the summit an appropriate use of conservation lands? The state Land Use Commission takes up that issue beginning today at its hearing in Hilo. 

Hui O Na Wai 'Eha

One of Hawaiʻi’s largest water rights cases is coming to a close on Maui next month after more than 16 years. The resolution is up to the state Water Commission—which will decide who gets water and how much. 

Dalisays/Wikimedia Commons / Creative Commons 3.0 License

As many as 150 Central American migrants seeking asylum have found their way to Hawaii from the U.S. Mexico border.

But to remain in the U.S., they must appear in immigration court in Honolulu and make their case for asylum, and that’s not been easy.

 

Flickr - University of Hawaii West Oahu

Enrollment at University of Hawaiʻi campuses fell for the seventh year in a row, and UH is hoping a statewide media campaign can help reverse that trend. 

User:Avriette/Wikimedia Commons / GNU Free Documentation License

The state’s commitment to remove five existing telescopes on Mauna Kea to build the Thirty-Meter Telescope remains part of the effort to resolve the protest on the mountain. But most of these telescopes are still operating and even TMT opponents see the value of keeping them online until their lease expires.

Hokuao Pellegrino

A group of East Maui taro farmers is urging the Hawaiʻi Supreme Court to overturn a ruling allowing continued use of public water by private users without environmental reviews.

 

Catherine Cruz

Protesters on Mauna Kea are on high alert preparing for what they say could be police action to clear them out this week. The group sent out a call-to-action to reinforce their numbers on Hawaiʻi Island, while supporters on O’ahu mobilized a cross-island convoy from Maunalua to Māʻili without major disruption.

 

Daniel Ramirez

Oʻahu motorists should expect traffic delays Sunday morning heading west from Hawaiʻi Kai to Waiʻanae. 

Office of Hawaiian Affairs

There’s no denying the power of music to inspire passion and spark social change – such has been the case throughout Hawaiʻi’s history. From the overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom to the current conflict on Mauna Kea, songs have inspired activism and activism has inspired songs.

Ku'uwehi Hiraishi

A Kauaʻi helicopter company is facing fines of up to $10,000 a day for structures that lack permits on its property in Port Allen. The tour company’s initial request for the Kauaʻi County permits was met with strong opposition from traditional salt makers who practice in nearby Hanapēpē.

Ku'uwehi Hiraishi

The words kapu aloha have emerged in the ongoing conflict over Mauna Kea. The term refers to a non-violent approach in Hawaiian activism. This code of conduct has its roots in the peaceful steps taken by Hawaiʻi’s last monarch, Queen Liliʻuokalani.

Office of Mauna Kea Management

Gov. David Ige says he’s pleased with progress made so far by Big Island Mayor Harry Kim in engaging the native Hawaiian community in efforts to resolve the conflict on Mauna Kea.

Hokuao Pellegrino

Mahi Pono, the Maui agricultural venture, is asking to divert stream water originally sought by the old Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Company that it never got. The state Water Commission is hearing the case today – and it could delay dozens of requests from others who have been waiting for years for water from Wailuku streams.

Flickr - University of Hawaii West Oahu

It's back to school today for nearly 50,000 University of Hawaiʻi students across the state. Total enrollment has been declining over the last decade, and officials have been trying to reverse the trend. But preliminary numbers suggest they have their work cut out for them. 

Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi

A lot has changed in astronomy since Hawaiʻi astronomer Doug Simons began his career more than 30 ago. And a lot has changed on the mountain. Now he’s working to ensure the next generation has the same opportunities that he had. 

Nate Yuen

Images from Mauna Kea of police arresting kupuna or elders and those of protesters chained to a cattle grate  can elicit strong emotions from many who see them. But for some native Hawaiians, these sights can serve as reminders of past injustices, triggering what the American Psychological Association calls “historical trauma.”

'Oiwi TV

The standoff on Mauna Kea enters week five Monday as protesters continue to block the summit road to prevent construction of the Thirty-Meter Telescope. TMT supporters say if the telescope isn’t built, that could jeopardize employment opportunities for islands residents.

Bryan Kamaoli Kuwada / Kanaeokana

Many native Hawaiians who oppose the construction of the planned Thirty-Meter Telescope on Mauna Kea say the mountain is sacred. But what does sacred mean and what is the foundation for that belief? Could we see similar challenges to activities on Haleakalā, Mauna Loa or Kīlauea?

Cristo Vlahos

Hawaiʻi is expected to see its 10 millionth visitor this year. The Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority says in the first half of 2019, tourist arrivals were up by 4 percent even while visitor spending fell. Communities statewide are feeling the growing presence of tourists -- at local beaches and on the roads. Now, University of Hawaii researchers are asking how precisely are visitors affecting local neighborhoods – like those in Windward Oahu.

KIANA MARSHALL/LAULANI TEALE

Compromise may seem like a long shot for those on all sides of the Thirty-Meter Telescope debate. Media reports, polling data, and statewide demonstrations can simplify a complex topic that continues to divide island communities. But there are folks who have changed their minds over time. Here are their stories.

Ku'uwehi Hiraishi

Long before concepts like sustainability and biodiversity became environmentalist buzzwords, native Hawaiians cared for their environment as a natural expression of their belief that the land is chief. Now a growing number of Hawaiian language speakers working in conservation are helping to unlock ancestral wisdom preserved in the ʻōlelo, and changing the industry in the process.

Ku'uwehi Hiraishi

The Honolulu Ethics Commission says it has not dismissed its investigations into retired Honolulu Police Chief Louis Kealoha and his wife, Katherine, a former city prosecutor. But the commission's former executive director called the commission's actions surrounding ethics complaints against the couple "careless." 

At an Ethics Commission meeting Wednesday, Chair Victoria Marks said there’s a lot of misinformation surrounding the board’s handling of the Kealohas cases.

Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum

The aviation industry faces a worldwide shortage of qualified pilots. Hawaiʻi has an even greater need, given our heavy dependence on air travel. To help close the gap, a summer flight school is targeting girls who have often been overlooked as future pilots -- and exposing them to a career that could take them anywhere.

Isaac Moriwake / Earthjustice

The possible sale of Molokaʻi Ranch is driving a community-led effort to end century-old diversions of the island’s stream water. The ranch continues to use water although its operations were shut down more than a decade ago. 

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