Ashley Mizuo

General Assignment/Community Reporter

Born and raised on O’ahu, she’s a graduate of ‘Iolani School and has a BA in Journalism and Political Science from Loyola University Chicago and an MA in Public Affairs Reporting from the University of Illinois-Springfield.   

Ashley’s first experience in audio storytelling was recording conversations with her grandfather about what it was like to grow up in Japanese internment camps during the second World War. More recently, she has been working as a statehouse reporter in Illinois’s capital city and before that as an editorial fellow at Washingtonian Magazine. She’s also done internships at the CBS Chicago bureau in their Specials and Investigation Unit and at Honolulu Magazine, where she wrote an award-winning feature story. She’s also worked in social media and produced and hosted a podcast asking people about their worst day at work—with the descriptive title “Work Sucks.”

Ways to Connect

U.S. Army

Parents can now find out just how their child’s public school will reopen on August 4th.

AP Photo/Audrey McAvoy

Diagnostic Laboratory Services Inc., the largest local lab in the state, warned that the number of tests it can run has been sharply reduced because it cannot obtain the supplies needed to process COVID-19 tests.

Amy Nakamura/HPR

The American Civil Liberties Union Hawaii Chapter is calling on the Honolulu Police Department to address racial disparities in its policing.

When Hawaii public school classes resume on August 4th, some schools could hold all in-person classes, others may have more online instruction and still others a blend of the two.

Boaski / Flickr

Mayor Kirk Caldwell says the city will be paying special attention to sanitizing and beautifying the Chinatown area. It’s an effort to help Chinatown businesses get back on their feet after revenue losses due to COVID-19.

 

AP Photo/Steven Senne

Updated: 7/1/2020, 11:51 a.m.

 

The Hawaii Health Department announced 9 new cases of COVID-19 today. Seven cases are on Oahu and two on Maui. Oahu's case count stands at 659, Maui County's at 125, Hawaii County's at 87 and Kauai's at 38. A total of 17 residents were diagnosed outside of Hawaii.

Sarah-Rose/Flickr / CC BY-ND 2.0 License

Honolulu police officers arrested Micronesians, Samoans and Blacks for violating the COVID-19 stay-at-home orders in marked disproportion to their representation in the general population, a Hawaii Public Radio investigation found.

Hawaii Department of Education website

When Hawaii public schools closed to slow the spread of COVID-19 and moved to distance learning, education advocates warned that students learning English were at high risk for falling behind.

Hawaii Department of Health website

Updated: 6/15/2020, 12:05 p.m.

Where we stand

The Hawaii Department of Health reported 8 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday. All are on Oahu. The increase follows Sunday's 5 new cases, Saturday's 17 cases and Friday's 15 infections.

After adjusting for updated testing information, the number of COVID-19 cases statewide now stands at 736. The number of deaths remains at 17.

daveiam/Flickr / CC 2.0 license

Updated: 6/10/2020, 1:11 p.m.

Where we stand

Four new cases of COVID-19 have been reported today by the state health department. All of the cases have been reported on Oahu. 

Pixnio

Updated  6/10/20 5:10 p.m.

The Hawaii Department of Human Services updated its classroom capacity guidelines Tuesday back to pre-pandemic ratios which are:

  • For three-year-olds, 12 children to one teacher
  • For four-year-olds, 16 children to one teacher
  • For five-and-over, 20 children to one teacher

Many child care providers are now reopening as more parents return to work. However, the added restrictions for social distancing have limited the number of children they can accept back. 

Rudy and Peter Skitterians/Pixabay / Pixabay license

The daily stream of COVID-19 news is unending. In its rigid grip, we can easily miss the Hawaii stories of struggle and quiet heroism that are playing out in our backyard. Here is a compilation of voices we've heard. And we look forward to hearing yours. Call our talkback line at 808-792-8217 or e-mail us at talkback@hawaiipublicradio.org

Cory Lum / Civil Beat

The state Department of Education recently released guidelines on reopening public schools. However, several members of the state Board of Education and the state teachers union took issue with some of the procedures on Thursday.

Wikimedia Commons

When Hawaii students return to classes in the fall after completing the last months of the school year through distance learning, many may have lost the earlier progress they made for lack of in-person instruction.

 

Hawaii State Department of Education

The Hawaii State Department of Education is closing about a third of its grab ‘n go food sites for the summer, and many more are taking a break until June 8th.

Hawaii’s public school students have been learning remotely since March due to the COVID-19 outbreak. However, some elementary schools are having an easier time than others because so much depends on a student’s access to the internet. 

Wokandapix / Pixabay

The Hawaii State Department of Education will begin offering summer school on June 1. The classes will be provided with a mixed approach of both distance learning and in-person instruction.

 

AP Photo/Seth Wenig

Updated: 5/19/2020, 9:06 a.m.

As more people in Hawaii take the COVID-19 antibody test, their results are providing information about how far the virus has spread statewide. While an antibody test cannot determine if a patient is currently sick, it can detect if someone had been infected by showing if someone has the antibodies produced after exposure to coronavirus.

Casey Harlow/HPR

Hawaii received another $50 million of federal funding to expand contact tracing and COVID-19 testing. The state Department of Health hopes that about half will be spent on improvements on the state laboratory.

Wikimedia Commons

Hospitals across the state have noticed sharp decreases in the number of patients visiting their emergency rooms since the COVID-19 outbreak.

Wikimedia Commons

Gov. David Ige’s newest emergency proclamation allows more businesses to reopen their doors as early as tomorrow.

Licensed child care services are among the operations that can restart, but parents returning to work at those businesses may find it hard to locate supervision for their kids and to afford the available care.

Suevon Lee

Hawaii’s public preschoolers have not had in-person classes since mid-March due to the COVID-19 outbreak. Instead, teachers have been using both take-home resource packets and the internet to continue to teach the state’s youngest learners. But there's a key part of early learning that's been lost.

 

Hawaii State Department of Education

In-person classes at Hawaii’s public schools were canceled due to COVID-19, but some students are not checking in online, and the state hasn’t been able to accurately account for those who are missing.

 

Cory Lum/Civil Beat

The city placed Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell’s plan to purchase $2 million worth of COVID-19 tests on hold after state Health Director Bruce Anderson wrote a letter criticizing the decision.

AP Photo/Seth Wenig

Antibody tests may be the key to learning how far COVID-19 has spread in Hawaii, and to getting people back to work. However, the state Department of Health doesn’t think the currently available tests are reliable.

University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

Hawaii was poised to hit its peak coronavirus medical need as soon as this past weekend, according to one widely cited coronavirus research institute. Yet the local numbers continue to climb and are likely to exceed 500 this week, begging the question: why doesn't the state have a solid idea of when the surge will come and whether it is prepared?

Flickr - Family MWR

Since Gov. David Ige’s stay-at-home order took effect, child care providers are now struggling to stay afloat. Many are unsure if they will reopen.

AP Photo/Eric Gay

The federal government has told state officials they are largely on their own when it comes to finding protective gear for their health care and emergency workers.

AP Photo/Alex Brandon

The state is expected today to get the new rapid coronavirus test kits that can produce results in about 15 minutes.

The state will receive 15 rapid testing instruments and five test kits a week, officials announced yesterday.

Each kit can run 24 samples for a total of 120 weekly tests.

State Health Director Bruce Anderson says it will not be used for community testing because of its limited availability.

Pixabay Commons
Pixabay Commons

The state is scrambling to identify enough medical professionals to care for a potential surge of coronavirus patients in Hawaii. However, some doctors are concerned that the outbreak will further worsen the state's long-standing physician shortage.

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