volcano

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Volcano Update, Storms and Shipping; Maui Homeless Strategy; Native Hawaiian Health

U.S. Geological Survey

Relocation has begun for some Puna residents forced from their homes by the Kilauea Eruption. Lava has been flowing on the Big Island for more than six weeks now, covering nearly 6,000 acres and destroying more than 500 homes. HPR Reporter Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi has this story.

USGS
USGS

In 1834, just fourteen years after missionaries first arrived in Hawai’i, an estimated 90-95% of Hawaiians could read.  Over a hundred Hawaiian language newspapers all through the Kindgom documented legends, place names, current events and everyday trials and tribulations, including volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and lava flows.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Kilauea Volcano has been erupting for more than a month now. Thousands of Big Island residents have been displaced and hundreds of homes have been destroyed. But natural disasters leave behind more than just physical damage. HPR Reporter Ku’uwehi Hiraishi has more.

USGS
USGS

With lava from Fissure 8 pouring into Kapoho Bay, the current eruptive phase at Kilauea is pressing into its fifth week, and its effects are taking a toll.  Hawai’i County is looking at $3-6 million dollars in volcano related expenses so far and the Island of Hawaii Visitors Bureau estimates a $5 million dollar loss through visitor cancellations.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports residents are holding firm.

Ku'uwehi Hiraishi

It’s been nearly a month since Kilauea Volcano uprooted the lives of thousands of Hawaiʻi Island residents. Lava has destroyed 82 homes and covered 15,000 acres of land. County officials say evacuees are now seeking more permanent plans to wait out the ongoing eruption. HPR Reporter Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi has more.

U.S. Geological Survey

Kilauea Volcano has been erupting for three weeks now, destroying 29 homes and covering more than 150 acres of land. But lava isn’t the only force that continues to threaten island residents. HPR Reporter Ku’uwehi Hiraishi has this story.

USGS
USGS

Kumu Hula Kekuhi Kealiʻikanakaʻole was raised in Hawaiian culture on Hawaiʻi island.  Her grandmother, educator Edith Kanakaʻole, was revered for her knowledge of hula and chant, and rigorous practice of those arts continues through Halau o Kekuhi, the family hula school.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports Kealiʻikanakaʻole’s view of the current eruption is firmly rooted in a connection with the lava, active continually underground.   

Volcano Helicopters
Volcano Helicopters

Kekuhi Kealiʻikanakaʻole is the Coordinator for the Center for Hawai’i Life Styles, UH Hilo. She’s an award winning singer, and a kumu hula, the eighth generation with Halau o Kekuhi, which bases its style of hula on the forces of Pele and her sister, Hiʻiaka.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports, Kealiʻikanakaʻole offers a different perspective on the current Kilauea eruption.

USGS
USGS

As personal stories and emergency updates continue around the current Kilauea eruption, Hawai’i’s resident teams of expert volcanologists continue their research and observations.  How is this eruption different from others?  How could a tsunami be generated?  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Kurayba / Flickr

Kilauea Lava Flow Update; Landlord-Tenant Challenges

Dexbaldon / Wikimedia Commons

The most active volcano in the Philippines has been erupting sporadically for more than two weeks.  Tens of thousands of people have been evacuated, but a great deal of uncertainty remains. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

One of the leading tourist destinations in the world has been disrupted in recent weeks by the threat of a volcanic eruption. The volcano is on the north side of Bali, but the impact has been felt across the island. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

Hawai‘i Island’s Kīlauea Volcano remains one of the most active in the world—its most recent eruption has been going on since 1983. Right now, the lava movements are not disrupting the lives of people. On the other side of the Pacific, it’s a much different story. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

UH Researcher Uses Data To Map Puna Lava Flow

Jan 7, 2015
USGS
USGS

Lava flowing from Kīlauea’s Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō Vent has left the lower Puna community in a state of limbo. The slow moving disaster has prompted one researcher to look at how residents are coping with the flow. HPR’s Molly Solomon spoke with him and has this report.

USGS
USGS

The lava flow heading towards Pahoa reached Apaa Street early Saturday morning. County officials say the lava crossed the road at 3:50 a.m. and was advancing at a rate of 10 yards per hour.

As of Saturday afternoon, the lava flow front is just six-tenths of a mile from Pahoa Village Road, the main drag that runs through town. County crews are currently going door-to-door to about 50 homes, alerting residents that are down-slope of the flow to prepare for a possible evacuation in the next three to five days.